Gladys Hamilton (Seattle) i was told that I can migos Psycho free download, but I did not believe, especially the year 1960 New York. Michael Whitehead (Lexington) Alfred Hitchcock Psycho free download Bluray at high speed, and even in the USA Cambridge.
Psycho
Year:
1960
Country:
USA
Genre:
Thriller, Mystery, Horror
IMDB rating:
8.6
Director:
Alfred Hitchcock
Anthony Perkins as Norman Bates
Vera Miles as Lila Crane
John Gavin as Sam Loomis
Martin Balsam as Milton Arbogast
John McIntire as Deputy Sheriff Al Chambers
Simon Oakland as Dr. Fred Richmond
Vaughn Taylor as George Lowery
Frank Albertson as Tom Cassidy
Lurene Tuttle as Mrs. Chambers
Patricia Hitchcock as Caroline
John Anderson as California Charlie
Mort Mills as Highway Patrol Officer
Storyline: Phoenix officeworker Marion Crane is fed up with the way life has treated her. She has to meet her lover Sam in lunch breaks and they cannot get married because Sam has to give most of his money away in alimony. One Friday Marion is trusted to bank $40,000 by her employer. Seeing the opportunity to take the money and start a new life, Marion leaves town and heads towards Sam's California store. Tired after the long drive and caught in a storm, she gets off the main highway and pulls into The Bates Motel. The motel is managed by a quiet young man called Norman who seems to be dominated by his mother.
Type Resolution File Size Codec Bitrate Format
1080p 1920x1040 px 13069 Mb h264 192 Kbps mkv Download
Reviews
A True Classic.
I feel that this movie is superior to Alfred Hitchcock's other films and that it, rather than "Vertigo", should be considered his masterpiece. Even though it was shot on a small budget, its suspense, thanks to Hitchcock's direction, Tomasini's flawless editing, and Bernard Herrmann's still holds up on multiple viewings. Also important to the film is solid acting from Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles and Martin Balsam and John L. Russell's constantly under-rated photography.
2000-02-06
Technique that defined an art
This definitely contains **SPOILERS**, and is intended only for those who have seen the film, although it's hard to imagine many of you out there who haven't already seen this remarkable film.

Let's start with what is probably the most amazing scene in the film, the conversation between Norman and Marian in the motel office parlor. Anyone interested in learning how to develop dramatic, and/or psychological tension, should study this scene. Sharp dialog, mood swings, marvelous camera angles and great character reactions permeate the scene. Much of the scene, and it's darkly humorous lines, hint at the truth about Norman and his mother without actually revealing it. For example, as Norman is bringing the tray of food into the office for Marian after an argument with mother, he says, "My mother is ...what's the phrase...she isn't quite herself today". In the parlor while Marian eats, Norman defends his mother with, "We all go a little mad sometimes". And just before Marian leaves the office she tells Norman, "I stepped into a private trap back there. I'd like to go back and pull myself out of it...if it's not too late". The irony being that Marian may have decided to try to escape her trap, but she has already, unknowingly been ensnared in Norman's private trap. Yes Marian, it is too late.

In another sequence while Norman and Marian are talking in the parlor, the camera is at eye level on both characters. Suddenly, when Marian brings up the subject of Norman's mother, the camera angle changes. Norman is now being viewed from a lower angle. We are looking up at Norman and, in the background, his stuffed owl with it's wings spread, clearly in an attack posture. At the same time, we are now seeing Marian at slight downward angle. Norman has become the predator and Marian the prey!

Now, how about lighting? In a scene very near the end of the film, Marian's sister has made her way into the fruit cellar, lit by one bare bulb, where mother sits in a wheelchair. Lila touches her shoulder, the wheelchair swings around revealing mother's well preserved corpse. Lila screams and draws her hand back hitting the light bulb, causing it to swing wildly. The end result is that the remainder of the scene is played out in alternating light and shadow due to the swinging bulb: Lila's terrified face, mother's corpse, Norman running into the cellar in mother's clothes wielding a butcher's knife, Sam running in behind Norman and dragging him to the floor, Norman's face becoming a twisted mask of despair as the knife falls to the floor and the wig slips from his head. It all has the look of a nightmare...macabre, surreal, and sheer genius!

I have always loved Hitch's brand of humor, dark or otherwise. Here are some of my favorites from this film: Marian talking to Sam in the motel room at the beginning of the film, "You make respectability sound...disrespectful". Charlie the used car salesman, speaking to Marian, who is obviously intent on trading in her car, "First time I ever saw the customer high pressure the salesman". Arbogast, the private detective, speaking to Norman at the motel, "If it doesn't gel, it isn't aspic...and this ain't gelling". Norman speaking to Sam, after Sam has implied that Marian may have made a fool of him, "She might have fooled me, but she didn't fool my mother". Lila to Sam, defending her decision to try to talk to Norman's mother, "I can handle a sick, old woman". How about the fact that Norman's hobby is stuffing birds, and in cleaning up mother's mess he stuffs a "Crane" into the trunk of a car. Classic Hitch!

Let me leave you with one last tidbit. In the final scene of the film Norman is sitting in a cell, wrapped in a blanket, and we hear mother's thought that is the last line of the film, "Why, she wouldn't even harm a fly". The scene then dissolves to a shot of Marian's car being dragged from the swamp. Just as Norman's image disappears from the screen, look closely and you will see the face of mother's corpse superimposed over Norman's face for a fraction of a second. One last little (subliminal?) chill from the master! I can see you all rushing to your VCR's now. Enjoy!
2001-01-08
A Chilling Classic.
The first time I saw Psycho, I watched the first 20 minutes and stopped the tape. I thought it was boring. But, alas, I rented it again a few weeks ago and I didn't like it. Didn't like it at all. I bloody loved it! Psycho is a freakin' masterpiece! It is easily Alfred Hitchcock's best film, and it is definitely an unforgettable chilling classic. Anthony Perkins was brilliant as Norman Bates, I will certainly look out for more of his work in the coming months. Janet Leigh was also very impressive, she was a real gem of Psycho.

So, don't make the same mistake I did, watch this classic today, and I guarantee you'll never forget it.

Rating: 10
2000-08-18
"A Standard Rave"
Strange what the passage of time can do to a film. I remember seeing portions of "Psycho" when I was very young on local TV; when our household became cable-ready a few years later and AMC showed actual movie classics, Hitchcock's film was regular on the rotation. I remember being shocked and impressed by Janet Leigh's shower demise and Martin Balsam's staircase tumble, but not too wild about the actual narrative. When you're less than 10 years old, you take for granted a lot of the nuances of film-making that only make sense when you're older.

And "Psycho" is almost entirely nuance and technique. From Anthony Perkins' legendary performance as the quiver-lipped, boyish Norman Bates to Bernard Herrmann's piercingly authorative, all-strings score to Hitchcock's intersection of characters (where misunderstandings and misplaced responsibility are the norm), the film is a masterful blend of all the elements that make for quality cinema. And for all its pop-culture influence (as it was one of the first 'psychological horrors' put on screen), "Psycho" remains extremely subtle and surprising, even if you know all the plot turns in advance.

See Marion. See Marion embezzle $44 grand from her boss. See Marion on the run from her own guilt. See Marion make a fateful stop at the Bates Motel. See Norman. See Norman talk about his abusive, domineering mother... (I needn't go any further.)

Since there is really no creative way to write about a film that has already been so extensively written on, I offer some of my personal favorite moments: The head-on shots of Marion (Janet Leigh) driving away from responsibility, listening to dialogues taking place far away, her facial expressions our only indicator of emotion. The judgmental look of the used-car salesman. The way Norman leans his head forward in the parlor, becoming somber and defensive over the word 'someplace.' The shriek of strings as the shower curtain is pulled back. Norman's awkward reaction to Private Investigator Arbogast (Martin Balsam)'s casual questioning. Arbogast's oblivious, seemingly slow-motion ascent of the staircase. Mrs. Bates' closing monologue, delivered in an acrid voice whose tone will literally make your skin crawl.

And there's a lot more. As much as it's been said already, I will have to concur that "Psycho" is probably Hitchcock's masterpiece (I haven't seen all of his films), a near-seamless blend of story, character, irony, and technique.
2006-11-06
One of the best horror films of all time. **** out of ****
PSYCHO (1960) ****

Starring: Anthony Perkins, Vera Miles, John Gavin, Martin Balsam, Janet Leigh, and John McIntire Director: Alfred Hitchcock Running time: 109 minutes Rated R (for scenes of strong violence)

By Blake French:

Alfred Hitchcock is easily one of the most acclaimed directors in film history--right up there with Stanley Kubrick and Steven Speilberg. His films defined horror for generations, especially with what many people are still calling the scariest movie of all time: "Psycho." Over the years, the movie has been given much praise. It has had the honor to be placed in the American Film Institute's best 100 movies of all time list. The film has had the privilege to be re-created in 1998 by great director Gus Van Sant, who also added new actors and coloration to this classic tale. "Psycho" also has had the fortunate pleasure to have been followed up by several time-lapsing sequels, although not equal in quality, which continued the story and characters beyond the original film's restrictions. On top of all this, the movie has a unique story line, unusual characters, imagination-provoking motives, and manages to conduct its rare structure like no other film. "Psycho" is one of the better thrillers of our time.

First lets take a look at the unique but perfectly organized structure of this classic horror tale. It beholds what I call a false first act. The first act opens by introducing a character named Marion Crane, sister of Lila Crane, who steals $40, 000 from her employer one day and is in the process of leaving town when her situation is complicated even more. Marion is pulled over by a mysterious police man, who checks out the circumstances, and then allows her to continue on with her journey. He then follows her many miles to a car dealer, where Marion cleverly trades her current car in for a used junkie to camouflage herself from peering foes. Marion then continues to drive along the busy highway until a shielding rainstorm persuades her to stop to rest at The Bates Motel. (spoilers ahead) Then she meets the owner, Norman Bates, who explains to her that his mother is a lunatic. Marion then goes to her cabin where she is stabbed to death in the shower by an unknown predator who looks like an old woman.

Extraordinary, a simply flawless false first act. The movie introduces a character, a problem, and complicates it for the character involved. Then the conclusion (the murder of Marion) solves the first initial problem, throwing us off balance. While we recover, the filmmakers open a brand new series of events, this time detailing the missing Marion Crane. A detective, Milton Arbogast, who tries to investigate Norman's mother, is also killed in the process of doing so. Lila's investigation of her own evolves the second act problems, all winding towards the same awe-inspiring denouement, which I will not have the audacity to reveal to you.

Now for some nice pointers for "Psycho": The opening scene develops Marion Crane's romantic characteristics as well as her personal morals. The scene in which Marion decides to commit theft is never explained to us through dialogue like many lesser films would do, but through Marion's complex stares at the cash and her reactions to it. The police officer's behavior is a whole plot in itself, and since the character's point of view is so focused, we know nothing more about this suspicious man than Crane herself. The Atmosphere of the Bates Motel is one of the creepiest moods I have ever experienced in the movies. Not to mention the famous shower scene, certainly the most shocking and grisly slasher moment of all time. The investigation of Marion's disappearance has a specific odyssey to it--intriguing and unsatisfying. All these minor elements contribute to making "Psycho" the most talked about films ever.

There is a small, but quite noticeable, opinion flaw in the last ten minutes of "Psycho," however. It is the scene where the detective explains the disturbing behavior of Norman Bates to the film's remaining characters, but also to the audience. This scene has never been necessary. The picture would have ended with much more controversy and fantasy if the writers would have left the strangeness of Norman to the imagination rather than explaining elements to us, not to mention the fact that all answers are revealed in the many sequels. I think it would have been interesting to see what happened if Gus Van Sant would have left that sequence out of his re-make, after all, he added a lustful masturbation scene, so why couldn't he have taken out some unneeded material as well. Oh well, I guess, until another actor attempts to master the terror found in the eyes of Anthony Perkins, we'll just have to juggle around these ideas in our minds of how this near-perfect movie could have been better. Don't you love it when movie's make you do that!

Brought to you by Paramount Pictures and Universal Pictures.

1999-10-27
This is one to watch again and again.
Alfred Hitchcock's crisp efficiency is not unlike that of Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins), the dutiful son who cleans up after his mother in the landmark thriller "Psycho." Not only is this a masterfully directed suspense chiller, it actually set standards by which all fright films since have been measured. The cinema has produced some great scores, but Bernard Herrmann's music is incredibly enhancing and simply unforgettable, one of the best ever (and it did not even get an Oscar nomination for Best Score). The more I watch "Psycho," the more I prefer the first half, with its sense of dread and a fascinatingly cool Janet Leigh (Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress). Hitchcock, of course, never won the Best Director Oscar, but was nominated for "Psycho," one of 1960's biggest box-office hits. Shockingly, Anthony Perkins, in a career-making role and one of the most famous performances in screen history, failed to win a Best Actor nomination -- probably because the performance was too edgy and disturbing (which is what made it great). Some scenes are dated, of course, but this film almost never falters. It gets a "9" (and a very high nine at that) from me.
2001-03-04
You'll be frightened every time you use a motel shower.
This is one of the most stunning movies my eyes have ever gazed upon. Anthony Perkins was electric in his performance as a deranged motel owner. I feel the direction was quite magnificent. I was amazed every time the camara pointed up the path to view the house on the hill where Norman Bates lived. The suspense was immense, at the beginning where Janet Leigh is about to steal the money and then sees her boss when she's leaving town to what would be a terrifying death. Movies this good are very rare and if you don't own a copy then I advise you get one as you can watch it over and over again.
2000-02-21
Movie At The Crossroads Of Time
What can you say about a film that's been talked about to death? Just this: If you've never seen it, you owe it to yourself to do so, not because it's a way of paying homage to the one true master of modern film, but because it's so fun to watch.

Janet Leigh plays a bored office drone who decides to steal some loot from her boss's obnoxious client and parlay it into a new life with her all-too-distant boyfriend. All is going more or less according to plan until she stops in at the wrong motel, where she befriends a friendly if somewhat nerdy desk clerk only to find it causes problems with that clerk's possessive mother, who as her boy explains, "is not herself today." I'll say she isn't, and so would Leigh's Marion Crane, who maybe should have put up that "Do-Not-Disturb" sign before taking a shower.

You can feel the decade literally shifting out of '50s and into '60s with this one. Even the opening shot, where the camera looks over a Western U.S. city in the middle of the afternoon and zooms in on what looks exactly like the Texas School Book Depository overlooking Dealey Plaza. Norman Rockwell touches abound, like the decor of the motel, but look at what's going on around it. People dress well, they still wear fedoras and jackets, but in their tense conversations and hooded gazes you can feel the culture just ticking away like a time bomb waiting to explode.

Most especially, there's Anthony Perkins, who plays motel clerk Norman Bates in a very oddly naturalistic way, complete with facial tics and half-swallowed words, not the polished image one expected to see then. Just compare him with John Gavin, who plays Marion's boyfriend in the standard-actor-of-the-day way. Perkins manages to be so weirdly magnetizing, even in small moments like the way he stumbles on the word "falsity" or notes how creepy he finds dampness to be.

He shines in bigger scenes, too, like his tense chat with Martin Balsam's boorish but diligent private detective character, Arbogast, who along with Perkins and Leigh delivers a landmark performance. The way both actors play out the awkwardness in their conversation makes you literally sweat. Then again, you're always uneasy around Norman. You definitely feel wary of him right away, but you find yourself liking him, too, even when he's busy covering up "Mother's" misdeeds. Not since Bela Legosi played Dracula did you get a horror movie with such a compelling central figure.

If you are sampling the many other comments here, be sure to look up Merwyn Grote's. He makes an interesting, compelling case for how director Alfred Hitchcock used his television series as a template for "Psycho." Certainly "Psycho" looks more like early 1960s television than any of the more sumptuous fare Hitchcock had been bringing to screen at the time. Not only is it in black-and-white, not color, but the sets; a ramshackle motel, a mothbally old house, a couple of cheap looking bedrooms, a bathroom in a used-car dealership, are deliberately low class.

It's thrilling to see Hitchcock move so effectively outside his normal element, and move things along with such clinical detachment and low-key technical finesse. Thrilling, too, to realize this is one of his most accomplished products; made by a man who was experienced enough to know how the game was played, and daring enough still to break the rules; indeed, start a whole new ballgame.

Is it the best Hitchcock movie? It's definitely one of his best, right up there with "The 39 Steps" and "Strangers On A Train" and "Sabotage" and "Shadow Of A Doubt." He only once again came close to making as good a film, with "The Birds," while Janet Leigh and Anthony Perkins never escaped the greatness they helped create here. Poor John Gavin had to quit the biz entirely, and became an ambassador.

Often imitated, parodied, referenced, and analyzed to death, "Psycho" still isn't played out nearly 45 years after it came out. You owe it to yourself to pay a visit to the Bates Motel; Norman has a room ready.
2004-08-10
Anthony's Norman
Getting into Hitchcock's Psycho, 57 years after its original release is like assisting to a masterclass of sorts. We can now identify what made this little lurid tale into a classic. Hitchcock himself, naturally, but now we know the first director's cut was a major disappointment and that Alma Reville - Hitch's wife - took over, re edited and the results have been praised, applauded and studied ever since. Janet Leigh's Marion Crane created a movie landmark with her shower scene. Bernard Herrmann and his strings created an extra character that we recognize as soon as it reappears under any disguise but, what shook me the most now in 2017 is Anthony Perkins as Norman Bates. His performance has evolved with the passing of time and its effect has remain as chilling, as moving, as funny and as real as it was in 1960. It's interesting to watch Gus Van Sant's 1998 version with Vince Vaugh as Norman Bates. If you look at the film, shot by shot with Berrnard Herrmann's strings - it's pretty fantastic. - Play it in black and white if you can. The problem and it is a monumental problem, we wait for Janet Leigh and Anthony Perkins, if the casting of Anne Heche was really bad - not a hint of Janet Leigh's humanity, the casting of Vince Vaughn was incomprehensible. Not just not credible for a moment but annoying, very annoying. Anthony Perkins brought something profoundly personal to Norman Bates and as a consequence we connected with his sickness. We felt for him. Okay, sorry, I didn't mean to go there but I felt compelled to because I saw again Psycho (1960) ad Psycho (1998) at 24 hours from each other and realized that the main flaw of the 1998 versions is the absence of Anthony Perkins.
2017-05-19
Roland J. Tran (Saint Paul) i was looking for a movie free Psycho download, as 720p to download it in 1960, one of the first Alfred Hitchcock Tallahassee. Clara J. Lovett (Buffalo) i love how they play Anthony Perkins, Vera Miles, John Gavin, Martin Balsam, John McIntire, Simon Oakland, Vaughn Taylor, Frank Albertson, Lurene Tuttle, Patricia Hitchcock, John Anderson, Mort Mills, Janet Leigh from the movie director Alfred Hitchcock 1960 Miami.
×